University of York logo
  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: $ 6.18k / Year
  • Foreign: $ 17k / Year
  • 教授言語:
  • English
  • StudyQA ranking:
  • 1090pts.
  • Duration:
  • 12 月

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    The MA in music offers study in the following specialist areas:

    Contemporary Studies

    This allows students to investigate areas of contemporary music either through research or through a combination of research and performance. Appropriate methods of analysis will be brought to bear on specific works, and techniques of research and criticism will be developed through essays, seminar papers and a dissertation/extended essay. Performance students are eligible for some financial contribution towards their instrumental or vocal lessons. Students will be offered advice on their choice of instrumental teacher; there are recommended visiting teachers in voice and most instruments. There is an opportunity to take guidance in the approach to conducting contemporary repertoire: technique; the preparation of scores; metric modulations, etc. In certain cases it may be appropriate to be assessed in conducting.

    Musicology

    This is concerned with the development of musicological research techniques, centred around historical rather than contemporary musical issues, and can serve as a preparation for the degree of MPhil. Typical areas which students might wish to address are: notation and editing; gender and music; genres; reception theory; historiographical, period-centred work (medieval studies, renaissance, etc.); musical institutions; specific composers. Period-centred studies, such as Early Music, may also be combined with performance.

    Analysis

    This specialism is concerned with practical applications of analysis in a programme of study centred around specific compositions selected by individual students, rather than investigating the theory of particular analytical techniques considered in isolation. The two main areas of work comprise a portfolio of analyses and a dissertation. The distinction between these two submissions lies in the self-contained nature of portfolio assignments and the way in which analytical findings subscribe to a larger thesis in the dissertation. The aim of the portfolio is to develop technical skills by applying a range of methodologies to a variety of pieces as appropriate to their compositional style. The aim of the dissertation is to apply analytical investigations to a wider context (such as the study of a composer, period, style, genre and so on) and to use analytical evidence to support a larger thesis.

    Composition

    This offers an opportunity for students with a flair for composition to develop their skills further. The Department has a large community of composers, from undergraduates to staff, with plenty of scope for informed debate and the performance of new music.

    Electracoustic Composition

    This programme aims to provide a stimulating environment in which electroacoustic composers can produce their own music. Electroacoustic composition focusses on the production of electroacoustic music for tape, tape with live instruments works for live computer and interactive compositions for computers and live performers. Dedicated facilities for the creation of electroacoustic and computer music are provided.

    Ethnomusicology

    This programme aims to provide a stimulating environment in which electroacoustic composers can produce their own music. Electroacoustic composition focusses on the production of electroacoustic music for tape, tape with live instruments works for live computer and interactive compositions for computers and live performers. Dedicated facilities for the creation of electroacoustic and computer music are provided.

    Performance

    This is designed for University and Conservatory graduates as well as for non-graduate performers. This is intended primarily for students wishing to study music from the late Renaissance to early Romantic periods. Students specialising in 20th Century or Contemporary Music should follow the Contemporary Studies specialism. Practical performance plays an important part in all first degree courses and postgraduate students are encouraged to participate as much as possible in appropriate undergraduate performance projects as well as in other areas of University music (e.g. Departmental Ensembles). The University Library houses a good collection of primary and secondary source materials in performance practice; the Music Department has an extensive collection of early instruments including two fortepianos, a square piano, four harpsichords, a spinet, a clavichord, a three-manual neo-classical organ, a continuo organ, a chest of viols and various Renaissance, Baroque and Classical instruments.

    Vocal Studies

    This is for students who want to explore issues in vocal performance before or after attending a conservatory or music college, musicians involved with singers (coaches, repetiteurs, etc) and anyone with an interest in any aspect of singing. Students may also specialise in Ensemble Singing, working in small groups singing one voice to a part on repertoire ranging from the 12th century polyphony of Perotin through Franco-Flemish music of the 15th century, 16th century Italian and English madrigals and 19th century partsongs, to the exciting and ever-expanding contemporary repertoire.

    Improvised Music and Jazz

    The new Master's pathway will be in Improvised Music and Jazz and is intended to embrace interactive technology and also improvisational traditions from other cultures, in conjunction with the department's ethnomusicology offerings. It will include workshops as well as seminars devoted to notation, transcription, and history. Intersecting with music technology and also with the distinguished composition staff at York, it will offer a unique programme of study of interest to practitioners and scholars alike. The first modules in the new programme will be offered this October, and places on the course are still available.

    Contemporary Studies

    Fortnightly tutorials, allowing the opportunity to discuss work on a one-to-one basis; attendance and contribution to regular seminars, e.g. Composers Seminar; attendance and contribution to departmental ensembles as appropriate and attendance and contribution to one or more relevant Undergraduate Projects (if appropriate).

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    Term 1: an essay plus either analysis or composition; or for performers, an essay plus a performance lasting not more than 30 minutes (performance may be a solo recital or, by arrangement, participation in an ensemble)
    Term 2: as above; however performers may replace the essay with an analysis or composition
    Term 3: either a dissertation of 15,000 words or an extended essay of 7,000 words and a recital lasting 45 minutes. The topic of the essay should normally be closely linked to the content of the recital.

    Students offering recitals are encouraged to write full programme notes.

    * Essay/Seminar paper (c 5,000 words): Friday week 1 Spring Term
    * Composition 1/Analysis 1/Performance 1*: Friday week 1 Spring Term
    * Essay/Seminar paper 2 (c 5,000 words): Friday week 1 Summer Term
    * Composition 2/Analysis 2/Performance 2*: Friday week 1 Summer Term
    * Dissertation/extended essay: Friday 17 September
    * Recital: final recital dates are Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 September 2004

    Students offering recitals are encouraged to write full programme notes.

    Performance assessment may take place earlier than the specified date, by arrangement with the supervisor.

    Musicology

    Term 1: Fortnightly tutorials allowing the opportunity to discuss work on a one-to-one basis. Attendance and contribution to regular seminars
    Term 2: As Term 1.
    Term 3: Fortnightly supervisions on the dissertation topic.

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    Two extended essays (7,000 words) together with a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

    Essay 1 Friday week 1 Spring Term,
    Essay 2 Friday week 1 Summer Term,
    Dissertation: Friday 17 September 2004Essay 1 Friday week 1 Spring Term,

    Analysis

    Term 1: Fortnightly tutorials allowing the opportunity to discuss work on a one-to-one basis.

    Term 2: as Term 1

    Term 3: Fortnightly supervisions on the dissertation topic

    Attendance at, and participation in, at least one Undergraduate Project, which is based around analytical approaches, as agreed in supervision.

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    A portfolio of analyses: four items of work are normally required, (two submitted Friday week 1 Spring Term and two submitted Friday week 1 Summer Term). A dissertation of approx 15,000 words (or equivalent, if diagrams are used) to be submitted by Friday 17 September.

    Composition

    Students work with an individual supervisor (one of the composers on the staff), and have regular tutorials that form the heart of the course. All students attend the weekly composers' seminars. These are of two kinds: either a general forum, which may include visiting composers and performers, or sessions devoted to a specific topic on which MA students present papers, preparation for which is in small study groups. Students will be required to write short pieces for performance and discussion at composers' workshops. Each year there will be an opportunity to write for professional performers (for example the resident ensemble).

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    At the end of the course composers present a portfolio normally consisting of four items of work submitted in terms 1 and 2, plus two further compositions. The four items of work submitted should be two compositions plus one essay and an agreed topic which may be a further composition or a further essay. All compositions must have been written during the duration of the course. In examining composition the major criteria are: competence in the handling of voices and instruments, demonstrated in works for a diversity of ensembles and textures; competence in the presentation of scores and parts, bearing in mind the practical demands of rehearsals and performance; imagination in the ability to create memorable and well-formed ideas; coherence in the ability to create the larger shapes inherent in the musical ideas. These qualities may be best realised in concise works, because credit will not be given for unsatisfactory longer works. All compositions must be accompanied by a short written commentary outlining the aims, background and technical procedures employed in each submitted composition.

    At the end of the course composers present a portfolio normally consisting of four items of work

    Composition 1 and essay (5,000 words) Friday week 1 Spring Term
    Composition 2 and agreed topic Friday week 1 Summer Term
    Portfolio (the above, plus two further compositions) Friday 17 September.

    Electroacoustic Composition

    Content
    * The production of at least one substantial electroacoustic work each term.
    * Tutorials of one hour are available fortnightly throughout the course.
    * Regular seminars on aesthetic issues and electroacoustic techniques.
    * Concert presentation of work produced.
    * Attendance at the MA Research seminar

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    The assessment criteria include: innovative use of electroacoustic media, imaginative musical design, and the ability to create concise large-scale forms. All works should be realised to the highest technical standards. All compositions must be accompanied by a short written commentary outlining the aims, background and technical procedures employed in each submitted composition.

    Composition 1 and essay (5,000 words) Friday week 1 Spring Term Composition 2 and agreed topic Friday week 1 Summer Term Portfolio (the above, plus two further compositions) Friday 17 September.

    Ethnomusicology

    (Full-time) Terms 1, 2 & 3: Fortnightly tutorials, covering the basis tenets and history of Ethnomusicology, including an introduction to transcription and analysis, and chosen area studies. Transcriptions should not, however, be regarded as merely a chore but rather as a means of adding music examples without which the work would be impoverished. Above all, they should demonstrate an inside knowledge of the relevant musical system, so a small number may adequately achieve this and adding several transcriptions for the sake of quantity would serve no useful purpose. The tutor will offer guidance according to the nature of the work being undertaken.

    Participation in any undergraduate Project on a non-Western topic offered in any of the three terms may also be recommended.

    Students are also expected to engage in performance, according to their skills and interests. This will take the form either of a recital (approximately 35-45 minutes) or participation in a non-Western performing ensemble, for example the Javanese Gamelan or Thai Pi-Phat. The former option is designed for those who already have performance skills in an area covered by them in the course, or who acquire them during the course to a sufficient level for a recital. Participation in an ensemble (plus other relevant performing) should continue throughout the course (at least in term-time). Students for this option should submit (by the September final deadlines given below) a brief (1-3 sides) record of achievement, detailing rehearsals attended and concerts played in.

    Part-time students: As above, except that the number of tutorials is reduced to 2-3 per term and participation in undergraduate projects may be waived.

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    Term 1: An essay (7,000 words) or equivalent portfolio of written work on general Ethnomusicology, with transcription and analysis: Submitted Friday week 1 Spring Term

    Term 2: An essay (7,000 words) or equivalent portfolio of written work on general Ethnomusicology, with transcription and analysis: submitted Friday week 1 Summer Term

    Term 3: A dissertation (approximately 15,000 words) incorporating fuller transcriptions and analyses, on a chosen area (which could well be the same as in Term 2): to be submitted by Friday 17 September.

    Recital: final recital dates are Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 September 2004

    Performance

    Fortnightly tutorials of one hour. These provide opportunities for one-to-one discussion of work in progress and guidance on the scholarly content of essays. When the undergraduate performance projects are being offered, postgraduate students are encouraged to attend (and to participate) as fully as possible (a day and a half each week for four weeks).

    Instrumental/vocal lessons:

    Students are normally expected to take fortnightly lessons and to seek assistance in preparing their programme. The University makes an allowance towards this tuition and students may discuss choice of teacher with Nicky Losseff, John Potter, Peter Seymour or Jonathan Wainwright at the beginning of the Autumn Term. All students are expected to participate in choirs, orchestras and chamber ensembles as appropriate.

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    Term 1: An essay of 5,000 words on an agreed topic. Submitted Friday week 1 Spring Term A performance of approximately 30 minutes, preferably related to topics being covered in the term

    Term 2: An essay of 5,000 words on an agreed topic. Submitted Friday week 1 Summer Term A performance of approximately 30 minutes, preferably related to topics being covered in the term, or ensemble performance as agreed.

    Term 3: A dissertation of approximately 7,000 words on an agreed topic. Submitted by Friday 17 September. Recital (approx 45 minutes): final recital dates are Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 September 2004. Students are encouraged to write full programme notes for their recitals.

    Vocal Studies

    Term 1 & 2: weekly seminar relating to the literature of performance practice; 1 hour per week alternate singing lessons and open masterclass format coaching sessions. Students are encouraged to develop an individual research and performance profile, tailoring the course to their own interests where feasible. Additional tutorials will be provided as necessary to assist them to develop a pro-active course of study.

    Term 3: Combined seminar/coaching sessions; individual or group tutorials as appropriate.

    Assessment/Submission dates:

    Term 1: an essay of 5,000 words plus a performance, or a longer essay (7,000 words) only. Submitted Friday week 1 Spring Term.

    Term 2: as Term 1. Submitted Friday week 1 Summer Term

    Term 3: either a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words or a 7,000 word essay plus a performance (approximately 45 minutes). Submitted Friday 17 September 2004.

    Recital: final recital dates are Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 September 2004 Students offering recitals are encouraged to write full programme notes.

    Improvised Music and Jazz


    UK requirements for international applications

    Universities in the United Kingdom use a centralized system of undergraduate application: University and College Admissions Service (UCAS). It is used by both domestic and international students. Students have to register on the UCAS website before applying to the university. They will find all the necessary information about the application process on this website. Some graduate courses also require registration on this website, but in most cases students have to apply directly to the university. Some universities also accept undergraduate application through Common App (the information about it could be found on universities' websites).

    Both undergraduate and graduate students may receive three types of responses from the university. The first one, “unconditional offer” means that you already reached all requirements and may be admitted to the university. The second one, “conditional offer” makes your admission possible if you fulfill some criteria – for example, have good grades on final exams. The third one, “unsuccessful application” means that you, unfortunately, could not be admitted to the university of you choice.

    All universities require personal statement, which should include the reasons to study in the UK and the information about personal and professional goals of the student and a transcript, which includes grades received in high school or in the previous university.


    program_requirements

    English Language Requirements The University's absolute minimum English language requirements are: * IELTS: 6.0 (in the 'Academic' test) * TOEFL: paper-based 550/ computer-based (CBT): 213/ internet-based (iBT): 79 * Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English: A, B, C * Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English: A English Language Requirements IELTS band: 6 CAE score: (read more) Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) is part of the Cambridge English suite and is targeted at a high level (IETLS 6.5-8.0). It is an international English language exam set at the right level for academic and professional success. Developed by Cambridge English Language Assessment - part of the University of Cambridge - it helps you stand out from the crowd as a high achiever. 80 (Grade A) TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test: 79 IMPORTANT NOTE: Since April 2014 the ETS tests (including TOEFL and TOEIC) are no longer accepted for Tier 4 visa applications to the United Kingdom. The university might still accept these tests to admit you to the university, but if you require a Tier 4 visa to enter the UK and begin your degree programme, these tests will not be sufficient to obtain your Visa. The IELTS test is most widely accepted by universities and is also accepted for Tier 4 visas to the UK- learn more.
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